How IT Professionals Can Work More Effectively with Physicians
By Stephen Fiehler

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Stephen Fiehler is IS service leader for imaging and interventional services at Stanford Children’s Health in Palo Alto, CA.

Be Agile – Work Around Their Schedule

Stop inviting orthopedic surgeons to your order set review meeting from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday at your offsite IT department building. That is not a good use of their time. And good luck getting them to log in and pay attention to your GoToMeeting from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. on Thursday.

Some electrophysiologists I work with are only available at the hospital at 7:00 a.m. on Tuesdays or Thursdays. I get there at 6:45 a.m. and have everything ready to go when they walk in the room so we can get through as much content as possible. The best time to meet with an invasive cardiologist is in the control room between cases. When I need to validate new content with them, I wear scrubs and work from a desk in the control room for half a day to get a cumulative 30 minutes of their time. This way, if cases run late, they can get home to their family at 8:00 p.m. instead of 9:00.

As long as I have my laptop, my charger, and an Internet connection, I can be productive from any location that works best for the physicians. Their time is more valuable than mine. The more time I take them away from patient care is less revenue for the hospital and fewer kids getting the medical treatment they need.

There are physicians that have the bandwidth to spend more time with us on our projects, but it is imperative that we not expect it from them.

Be Brief – Keep Your Emails Short and Concise

Review your emails to physicians before sending them. You could probably communicate as much, if not more, with half the words.

When I was at Epic, one of the veteran members on the Radiant team had a message on his Intranet profile instructing co-workers to make emails short enough that they could be completely read from the Inbox screen of the iOS Mail app. Any longer, and you could assume he would not read or reply.

If an email has to be long, bold or highlight your main points or questions. Most physicians have little time to read their email. Show them you value their time and increase the likelihood that they will read or reply to your message by keeping it concise. Writing shorter emails helps you waste less of your own time as well.

Also, use screenshots with pointers or highlighted icons when appropriate. They might not know what a “toolbar menu item” or a “print group” is.

Be Service-Minded – Do Not Forget IT is a Service Department

The biggest mistake a healthcare IT professional can make is forgetting that we are a service department. The providers, staff, and operations are our customers. It is our job to provide them with the tools they need to deliver the best patient care possible. That is why the IT department exists.

Given the complexity of our applications, integration, and infrastructure, it is tempting to forget that we are not the main show. Whether we like it or not, we are the trainers, equipment managers, and first-down marker holders, whereas the providers are the quarterbacks, wide receivers, and running backs.

By focusing on providing the best service possible, you will implement better products and produce happier customers. At the end of the day, we want to be effective and to have a positive impact on the organization. The best way to do that is through being service-minded.