Organisations managing citizen data can open their processes for third-party review to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. This is an area where England’s test and trace programme ran into issues, as it did not carry out a thorough enough assessment on data compliance before launching. The Open Rights Group even stated that the programme breaks GDPR data law.
All gatekeepers of public COVID-19-related data should commit to only using the data for purposes that contribute to fighting the pandemic, and ensure that they delete citizen data as soon as it loses its relevance (from 30-60 days after collection, in the case of contact tracing). In addition, organisations that are monitoring and collecting data on employees should clarify how it is being used and for what purpose from the get-go.
There’s little doubt that data holds huge value in the fight against COVID-19 and the return to some resemblance of normality for citizens. That doesn’t, however, give collectors of public data the permission to use it as they please. In order to ensure that those who provide data do not fall foul to its mistreatment, government institutions, health care bodies, employers, and any other organisation collecting, using, and storing public data must commit to extensive data protection methods and its authorised use.

The post The dangers of data collection appeared first on Compare the Cloud. Organisations managing citizen data can open their processes for third-party review to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. This is an area where England’s test and trace programme ran into issues, as it did not carry out a thorough enough assessment on data compliance before launching. The Open Rights Group even stated that the programme breaks GDPR data law.
All gatekeepers of public COVID-19-related data should commit to only using the data for purposes that contribute to fighting the pandemic, and ensure

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