This morning I had a chat with a colleague who was having a little issue with his website not displaying the images that he was inserting into blog posts. The problem was that he was trying to insert images via URL instead of uploading images to host on his blog. In short, he was hotlinking images. Explaining that process to him reminded me of the following information that I wrote for a course about blogging that I used to teach.  What is hotlinking?In a nutshell, hotlinking is inserting a picture into a blog post through a URL rather than uploading the image file itself to your blog. You can read more about hotlinking on the Simple English Wikipedia or on Host Gator’s page about preventing hotlinking to your own work.Why you and your students should avoid hotlinking.Hotlinking itself isn’t bad if you’re only linking to images that you own and control online. For example, let’s say that you have a Flickr account to which you upload dozens of pictures that you took. You could use the embed code or the link that Flickr provides to post your images in your blog post.When hotlinking causes trouble is when you link to another person’s image hosted in their account or on their servers. Even if the image is in the public domain you probably don’t want to hotlink to it. In fact some services will block attempts at hotlinking. They block hotlinking because when you hotlink you’re using more of their bandwidth than if you simply downloaded the image to your computer then uploaded it to your blog.The biggest concern about hotlinking is not knowing exactly who or what you’re linking to. It is possible that the image you linked to and the image displayed could be changed without warning. It’s also possible that

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