Much has been written about US generations for, well, generations. Starting with the “Lost Generation” that fought in World War I right up to our present-day debates about what to call the Post-Millennial audience, Americans have an endless fascination with the differences between these seemingly distinct and roughly 20-year age groups. But as society and technology evolve at a faster rate than ever, perhaps the parameters for each generation will shrink over time?
The “Xennial” generation is a term recently coined for those stuck sandwiched by Gen X and those industry killers, the Millennials. Born (roughly) between 1977 and 1983, this group is caught between two worlds in more ways than one. They grew up as technology did, learning to use computers and cell phones in their teen and college years. Many were hit hardest by the tech bust, 9/11, and the Great Recession, which happened at critical moments in their nascent careers. And they exhibit a curious mix of the cynicism of their Xer elders and the optimism of their younger counterparts.
Recent research from GfK Consumer Life uncovers how Xennials serve as the bridge between the infinitely dissected Millennials and oft-neglected Generation X. A quick look at their outlooks on finance, technology, and the home spotlights a unique group worth taking more seriously.
Confident and driven
In spite of living through major financial instability, Xennials remain more financially bullish than their elders – and their juniors. GfK Consumer Life research shows that they’re most likely to believe that now is a good time to make purchases, feel that the US economy is fair in the opportunities it provides, and be satisfied with the amount of money they have to live on today. They also lead in the belief that the best place to put money is where it can generate income – not

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